Analysis for 'Nielsen'

  • Nielsen: Connected TV Devices' Penetration Continues to Increase

    Connected TV device penetration and usage are continuing to grow according to new data from Nielsen as of January 31st. Overall, Nielsen found that 23% of TV homes now own an Amazon Fire TV, Apple TV, Google Chromecast or Roku, up from 19% in June, 2016. Nielsen didn’t specify the exact share for each device, only saying that Roku and Apple TV have the highest penetration, with Fire TV and Chromecast following.

    In addition to the “big 4,” another 11% of TV homes have other brands of connected TV devices or have their computers/tablets/smartphones connected to their TVs.

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  • Videology: Use of TV Audience Data to Target Video Ads Up 114%

    With audiences shifting seamlessly between screens, evidence that TV advertising and online video advertising are also converging is mounting. The latest is from Videology, which has released its Q4 ’15 U.S. Video Market At-A-Glance report, finding, among other things that online video campaigns using TV audience data for targeting increased by 114% year-over-year.

    The top segment used was advertisers’ current TV advertising schedules, followed by sports viewers, political show viewers, competitors’ TV schedule and daytime viewers.

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  • Nielsen's Q3 '14 Data Shows Huge Drop in Linear TV Viewing as Online Video Surges

    Nielsen has released its Q3 '14 Total Audience report (which is the new name for the previous quarterly Cross-Platform report), the highlight of which is the marked reduction in linear TV viewing across every age group except 65+, with an accompanying surge in online video. I charted the new Q3 '14 data vs. Q3 '13 data below.

    The big quarter-vs-quarter change that pops out is the 19.2% reduction in linear viewing per week by adults 18-24. This age group is now watching 17 hours, 34 minutes per week, which is 4h, 11m less than the 21h, 45m a year ago. While this group increased its online video usage by 20.7%, that only accounted for 25 incremental minutes per week.

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  • Adobe: Online Video Starts in Q2 '14 Hit Record High of 38.2 Billion

    Adobe's Q2 '14 U.S. Digital Video Benchmark report has found that global online video starts hit 38.2 billion, a 43% increase vs. Q2 '13 and a new record among Adobe customers. Q2 was fueled in part by the heavily streamed World Cup matches in June. Mobile continued to experience strong growth too, with 26% of starts occurring on mobile devices, up from 19% a year earlier. Smartphones notched 13.6% of starts vs. 13% for tablets, the first time smartphones have pulled ahead. However, just 16.6% of mobile videos reached 75% completion.

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  • Study: Mobile Video Provides Cost-Effective Incremental Reach to TV Ads

    BrightRoll has released a new study, conducted by Nielsen, which concludes that mobile video advertising provides cost-effective incremental reach to TV advertising. Nielsen found the following incremental reach with mobile video ads in 4 verticals it studied: CPG (12.7%), Auto (11.9%), Telecom (9.5%) and Financial Services (9.9%).

    Underlying the incremental reach benefit of mobile video is Nielsen's estimate that once a brand hits 60% or more of its target audience with TV advertising, there's a point of diminishing returns, making incremental reach very expensive.

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  • Nielsen: Online Video Viewing Per Day Has Doubled in Past 2 Years

    Nielsen has released its Q2 '14 Cross-Platform Report, finding among other things, that online video viewing/day for Americans age 18-64 has doubled from an average of over 13 minutes in Q2 '12 to an average of over 27 minutes in Q2 '14. The 18-34 age group leads with 35 minutes/day in Q2 '14, followed by 35-49 year-olds (26 minutes/day) and 50-64 year-olds (19 minutes/day).

    Despite the gains, TV viewing still dwarfs online viewing, and held up pretty well over the 2 year period. For 18-34 year-olds, TV viewing in Q2 '14 was 4 hours, 17 minutes (a 10 minute decline since Q2 '12), for 35-49 year-olds it was 4 hours, 57 minutes (an 8 minute decline) and for 50-64 year-olds TV viewing was 6 hours, 12 minutes (a 5 minute increase).

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  • Nielsen: Over Half Of Broadband-Only Homes Are Age 18-34

    Nielsen released its latest Digital Consumer Report yesterday, finding among things, that 52% of broadband-only homes in the U.S. are in the 18-34 age range. Nielsen notes this group accounts for fewer than 5% of total U.S. households, but believes it's important to understanding the future digital living room. Nielsen said 80% of this group owns game consoles and 41% tablets, both twice the rate of traditional TV households.

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  • Multi-Screen Ad Budgets to Increase from 20% Today to Nearly 50% in Three Years: Nielsen/ANA

    According to a recently released study by the Association of National Advertisers (ANA) and Nielsen, multi-screen advertising will grow from 20% of advertisers' budgets today to nearly 50% in the next three years. While 48% of respondents said they believe multi-screen campaigns are very important in effectively delivering marketing messages, almost twice as many (88%) believe that these types of campaigns will be very important in three years. 


    One of the biggest issues for multi-screen advertising is measurement due to a huge gap between existing measurement approaches and how respondents would prefer to measure integrated multi-screen campaigns. 71% of survey respondents said they use a variety of metrics specific to individual screens, but 73% said they would prefer to use just one set of metrics across all screens.

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  • Nielsen: 88% of Netflix and 70% of Hulu Plus Users Now Binge-Viewing

    Nielsen released additional data from its Q2 2013 Cross Platform report substantiating the trend toward "binge-viewing." Nielsen found that a whopping 88% of Netflix users and 70% of Hulu Plus users say they watch 3 or more episodes of the same show in one day.

    The Nielsen data is directionally in line with survey results that Piksel released last week showing 94% of respondents engage in some type of binge-viewing behavior, either watching episodes together as quickly as possible, watching 1 or 2 every few days, or some combination of the two behaviors.

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  • Nielsen: Social Dominates Video on Mobile Devices and Online Viewing is Up Strongly

    Periodically someone asks me how I think of the relative level of social networking use vs. video consumption. Of course they have both have been huge trends over the past 5 years, and they are very complimentary to each other. But, at least when it comes to mobile devices (smartphones and tablets) social dominates video in terms of time spent according to Nielsen's Q1 Cross-Platform Report, released late last week.

    Looking at app-only usage on smartphones, social networking notched 9 hours, 6 minutes per person per month, nearly 8x as much as the 1 hour, 15 minutes of video viewed per person per month. For iPads, the range is tighter, with app-only social networking racking up 3 hours, 41 minutes per person per month, just over twice as much as the 1 hour, 48 minutes of video viewed per person per month. This makes sense to me because the iPad is more of a "personal TV" and therefore prone to longer-form viewing.

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  • Does Strong SVOD Adoption in Wealthier Homes Suggest Slower Subscriber Growth Ahead?

    At starting prices of $8/month or so, affordable subscription video on demand (SVOD) services like Netflix, Hulu Plus, Amazon, Blockbuster and others would seem to appeal to middle and lower income Americans. But a new report from Nielsen finds the exact opposite is true: wealthier homes, with household income over $100K/year, adopt SVOD services at 185% of their index, while lower income homes, with household income under $50K/year, subscribe at just 47% of their index.

    Adding to the picture, "Professional" homes subscribing to an SVOD service are at 150% of their index, while "Blue Collar" homes are just 63% of their index.

    The data seems to support a contention that Netflix has repeatedly made, which is that SVOD services are typically adopted in addition to - not in substitution for - pay-TV services. To the extent that pay-TV rates have continue to increase, it makes sense that only upper income homes can afford to then layer on an SVOD service on top of pay-TV.

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  • Sharethrough Finds Higher Brand Lift for Native Video Ads vs. Pre-Roll

    Native advertising, which refers to branded content or ad messages that are cohesively integrated directly into web sites, are getting lots of attention these days as an alternative to pre-roll video advertising. A study released by Sharethrough and Nielsen today is putting some brand lift performance numbers behind the debate.

    Using Nielsen's Online Brand Effect tool to measure viewer response, the native advertising technology specialist found that five campaigns it studied produced higher brand lift from native advertising exposure than from pre-roll video impressions. In a campaign for the soft drink brand Jarritos, exposure to native ad content elevated favorable brand perceptions by 82%, compared with 2.1% lift among those who saw pre-roll ads. In another for a CPG brand, native ads drove a 42.2% brand lift vs. none for pre-roll ads. (see infographic below)

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  • VideoNuze Podcast #171 - More on Zero-TV Homes, TV Everywhere's Embarrassment and Binge-Viewing

    I'm pleased to present the 171st edition of the VideoNuze podcast with my weekly partner Colin Dixon of nScreenMedia. Leading us off today, Colin digs into Nielsen's new "zero-TV" homes data, part of its Q4 '12 Cross-Platform report. When Colin crunches the numbers, he concludes that the  U.S. pay-TV industry may have lost 1.1 million subscribers last year, who moved into the zero-TV category.  That would be above other estimates, which range from flat to down about 500K.

    Of course one of the industry's key initiatives to add value has been TV Everywhere, and on that front, there were refreshingly candid admissions this week from both David Levy, head of Turner's sales, distribution and sports, who said he was "embarrassed" at TV Everywhere's progress, and Lauren Zalaznick, NBCU's chairman, entertainment and digital networks, who said it's too confusing. Both are right, and there are other reasons as elaborated in the recent Ultimate Guide to TV Everywhere (free download).

    Contributing to the pressure on pay-TV providers is the ever-expanding range of quality content available online, and 2 more efforts surfaced this week, Conde Nast's new digital video network, and VEVO TV, a 24x7 music video network.

    Separate, Colin has released his excellent new white paper, "Second-Screen Apps for TV" (free download here)

    And a reminder to sign up for "Sizing Up Apple TV" a free video webinar on April 2nd featuring Brightcove's Jeremy Allaire and me.
        
    Listen in to learn more!

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  • Growth in "Zero-TV" Homes is Zero Surprise

    Nielsen's new Q4 '12 Cross-Platform Report has identified just over 5 million "zero-TV" homes in the U.S., as Nielsen calls them, an increase from 2 million in 2007. Not to be confused, these aren't homes without TVs (75% of them still have at least one); rather they are homes that don't receive programming over traditional platforms (i.e. pay-TV and broadcast). Instead, almost half of them (48%) opt for OTT services like Netflix, Hulu Plus and others for content.

    The growth in "zero-TV" homes should come as zero surprise. In fact, if there's anything surprising, it's that the number isn't already higher. But who these zero-TV homes are is less clear: are they cord-cutters or cord-nevers? The fact that almost half of them are under 35 suggests many are cord-nevers. Yet, the 2 main reasons for not subscribing to pay-TV (36% due to cost and 31% due to lack of interest) suggests many cord-cutters. Either way, with only 18% of them considering subscribing to pay-TV, most may well be "permanently cordless" and beyond the industry's promotional efforts.

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  • Google/YouTube: Research Shows Lighter TV Viewers Primed for Online Video Ads

    It's no secret that with consumer behavior fragmenting over different video sources and media-related activities, advertisers are having a tougher time than ever reaching their targeted audiences. Especially elusive are younger, lighter TV viewers. No surprise, these lighter viewers skew younger with about 31% of 18-49 age group in the category. They're also choice targets for advertisers: they're wealthier, more educated and more diverse.

    To help prove the efficacy of online video advertising as a method for reaching these viewers, yesterday Google/YouTube and Nielsen released new research demonstrating that lighter TV viewers (who average 39 minutes per/day) are more effectively and cost-efficiently reached with online video advertising that compliments traditional TV advertising.

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  • Study: Online Video Ads Complement TV Ads

    Departing from the typical industry party line that online video needs to shift ad spending away from TV, today YuMe and Nielsen are announcing results of a new study showing that online video advertising is actually complementary to TV advertising and that the two should be paired to optimize results. The proposition is that with an integrated "TV 2.0 media planning" approach, advertisers get the best of both worlds: TV's unparalleled reach and online video's interactivity and engagement.

    In the study, YuMe layered a concurrent $500K online video campaign onto a $2.6M September 2011 TV flight for a consumer packaged goods advertiser. YuMe allocated the online spend using Nielsen's TV/Internet Fusion panel in order augment the TV buy. The key findings included:

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  • VideoNuze Report Podcast #107 - CTAM/Nielsen Research - Aug 5, 2011

    Daisy Whitney and I are pleased to present the 107th edition of the VideoNuze Report podcast, for August 5, 2011.

    In this week's podcast, Daisy and I discuss research released earlier this week by CTAM and Nielsen which found, among other things, that 85% of video app users are watching the same or more regularly scheduled TV. In addition, the research found that around 75% of video app usage on mobile devices actually occurs in the home. Daisy and I talk about the implications of the research, and additional data points we've seen that reinforce its conclusions.

    Click here to listen to the podcast (11 minutes, 13 seconds)


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  • 85% of Video App Users Watching Same or More Scheduled TV: Study

    For those fearing that video consumption through mobile and connected devices threatens to disrupt traditional linear TV viewership, a new study suggests it's not happening en masse, at least not yet. The study, fielded by Nielsen and the Cable & Telecommunications Association for Marketing (CTAM) indicates that 85% of video app users are watching the same or more regularly scheduled TV. There's no trend data however, so it's not clear how the amount compares to a year or two ago.

    Further good news is that video apps appear to be adding value to TV programs and TV networks. As the below graphic shows, 46% of video app users report more engagement with the program/network, 35% report more visits to the program/network web site, and 37% report watching more associated programs or networks.

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  • ESPN Continues Dampening Cord-Cutting Fears

    ESPN released the its latest round of research on cord-cutting this week, finding that a tiny .18% of American homes with both pay-TV service and a broadband connection dropped their video service between the fourth quarter of 2010 and the first quarter of 2011. ESPN said the .18% is actually lower than the .28% it found in its prior period research and is fully offset by a comparable number of people who upgraded from a "broadcast-only" service level to a full pay-TV package. Not surprisingly, ESPN said that among medium-to-heavy sports viewers there was zero cord-cutting.

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  • PwC's New Viewership Research Shows Vastly Changed Landscape

    A industry friend passed me a copy of PwC's new research on viewership across platforms and by age groups this week, which shows a vastly changed landscape for entertainment consumption. On the top line, the research reports that consumers are watching 12.4 hours/week of TV and movies via download, streamed, digitally recorded and online, vs. 8.9 hours of TV and movies on network TV and basic cable. When looked at by three age groups, 18-34, 35-44 and 45-59, only the latter category watches more network TV/cable, and only for TV shows, not movies (see chart below).

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